Read: 7 Reasons Why You Will Never Do Anything Amazing With Your Life

Read: 7 Reasons Why You Will Never Do Anything Amazing With Your Life

Raymmar Tirado is a Creative strategist and professional instigator of ideas. Asker of Questions, Seeker of Truths

Continue reading “Read: 7 Reasons Why You Will Never Do Anything Amazing With Your Life”

Facebook Continues Redesign Rollout With New Look for Pages

Facebook Continues Redesign Rollout With New Look for Pages

Facebook redesigned its news feed last week, but the company isn’t stopping there. Next up for a makeover is Facebook Pages.

Facebook announced a new look for Pages on Monday, changing the appearance for both Page visitors and Page admins to what the company is calling a more “streamlined” look.

The new design includes two columns similar to the old version, but the right column is now the Page’s timeline and the left includes information about the brand or corporation. In the previous design, both columns served as the Timeline; posts were staggered between the left and right columns as users scrolled down.

New-FB-Pages

Old-FB-Pages

In the new design, the “Invite Your Friends” section has moved from the right side of the screen to the left, and the text box for posting switched from the left to the right side.

For Page admins, a new metrics section on the far right-hand side of the Page includes data about ads, Likes and post reach. Facebook is also rolling out “Pages to Watch” for all admins, meaning users can create a list of similar or competitor pages to compare metrics like engagement and Page Likes.

The redesign comes less than a week after Facebook updated the look for news feed, a relatively minor change that included larger photos and new icons and fonts. That change was a year in the making, and Monday’s update appears to be in the same vein, using similar fonts and icons.

The new design is rolling out this week, according to a spokesperson, and is changing for web only. Facebook announced a mobile redesign for Pages last April.

via Mashable

The Simplest Formula for Career Happiness

The Simplest Formula for Career Happiness

Being happy at work is complicated.

After all, there are so many factors that go into it: your relationship with your boss and your co-workers, the fulfillment (or lack thereof) you get out of your day-to-day tasks, the mission that your company is working toward. Not to mention if what you’re doing today is what you think you want to be doing five, 10, or 20 years from now.

Most of us (ourselves included) have felt frustrated or unhappy at work—and worse, felt stuck in whatever circumstances are causing us to feel that way. And that is tough.

But sometimes, it doesn’t have to be as tough as we’re making it.
We were reminded of that fact when we came across this brilliant—and brilliantly simple—infographic showing that happiness (at work or otherwise) is entirely in our hands.

are-you-happy_50290b3f1c94f_w540

OK, we know it’s not always as simple this. But, we think it’s a good reminder that, any time we’re feeling less-than-thrilled with something going on, that we each have the power—and the responsibility—to make a change.

via Mashable

What The Music You Love Says About You And How It Can Improve Your Life

What The Music You Love Says About You And How It Can Improve Your Life

The Music You Love Tells Me Who You Are

Ever been a bit judgey when you hear someone’s taste in music? Of course you have.

And you were right — music tells you a lot about someone’s personality.

Research has learned a great deal about the power of music:

  1. Your musical taste does accurately tell me about you, including your politics.
  2. Your musical taste is influenced by your parents.
  3. You love your favorite song because it’s associated with an intense emotional experience in your life.
  4. The music you enjoyed when you were 20 you will probably love for the rest of your life.
  5. And, yes, rockstars really do live fast and die young.

But enough trivia. It also turns out music affects your behavior — and much more than you might think.

Studies show music can lead you to drink more, spend more, be kind, or even act unethically.

No, rock and heavy metal don’t lead people to commit suicide — but it’s possible that country music might:

The results of a multiple regression analysis of 49 metropolitan areas show that the greater the airtime devoted to country music, the greater the white suicide rate.

Music is so powerful it’s even possible to become addicted to music.

But can we really use scientific research on music to improve our lives? Absolutely.

Here are 9 ways:

1) Music Helps You Relax

Yes, research shows music is relaxing.

I know, I know, obvious, right? But what you might not know is the type of music that helps people relax best.

Need to chill out? Skip the pop and jazz and head for the classical.

Via Richard Wiseman’s excellent book 59 Seconds: Change Your Life in Under a Minute:

Blood pressure readings revealed that listening to pop or jazz music had the same restorative effect as total silence. In contrast, those who listened to Pachelbel and Vivaldi relaxed much more quickly, and so their blood pressure dropped back to the normal level in far less time.

2) Angry Music Improves Your Performance

We usually think of anger as something that’s just universally bad. But the emotion has positive uses too.

Anger focuses attention on rewards, increases persistence, makes us feel in control and more optimistic about achieving our goals.

When test subjects listened to angry music while playing video games, they got higher scores.

Via The Science of Sin: The Psychology of the Seven Deadlies (and Why They Are So Good For You):

What Tamir and her colleagues found was that people preferred to listen to the angry music before playing Soldier of Fortune. Faced with a task in which anger might serve a useful function, facilitating the shooting of enemies, participants opted for an anger boost. What’s more, listening to the angry music actually improved performance…

3) Music Reduces Pain

When ibuprofen isn’t doing the job, might be time to put on your favorite song.

Research shows it can reduce pain:

Preferred music was found to significantly increase tolerance and perceived control over the painful stimulus and to decrease anxiety compared with both the visual distraction and silence conditions.

4) Music Can Give You A Better Workout

What’s the best thing to have on your iPod at the gym?

The weight room is no place to try new genres. Playing your favorites can boost performance:

The performance under Preferred Music (9.8 +/- 4.6 km) was greater than under Nonpreferred Music (7.1 +/- 3.5 km) conditions. Therefore, listening to Preferred Music during continuous cycling exercise at high intensity can increase the exercise distance, and individuals listening to Nonpreferred Music can perceive more discomfort caused by the exercise.

5) Music Can Help You Find Love

Want to get the interest of that special someone? Put on the romantic music.

Women were more likely to give their number to men after hearing love songs:

…the male confederate asked the participant for her phone number. It was found that women previously exposed to romantic lyrics complied with the request more readily than women exposed to the neutral ones.

6) Music Can Save A Life

Do you know the proper way to give CPR chest compressions? Turns out timing is key.

And how can you best remember that timing during an emergency?

Sing “Stayin’ Alive” by the BeeGees. Yes, I’m serious:

…Dr. John Hafner of the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Peoria had 15 physicians and med students perform the 100-compression procedure (on mannequins) while listening to the Bee Gees classic “Stayin’ Alive.” As Hafner reports in the Journal of Emergency Medicine, their mean compression rate was an excellent 109.1. Five weeks later, they repeated the exercise while singing the song to themselves as a “musical memory aid.” Their mean rate increased to 113.2. The medical professionals reported that the “mental metronome” improved both “their technical ability and confidence in providing CPR.”

7) Music Can Improve Your Work — Sometimes

Does music at the office make you work better or just distract you? It’s a much debated issue and the answer is not black and white.

For the most part, it seems music decreases work performance – but makes you happier while you work:

…a comparison of studies that examined background music compared to no music indicates that background music disturbs the reading process, has some small detrimental effects on memory, but has a positive impact on emotional reactions…

That said, a little bit of music can make you more creative. If you have ADHD, noise helps you focus:

Noise exerted a positive effect on cognitive performance for the ADHD group and deteriorated performance for the control group, indicating that ADHD subjects need more noise than controls for optimal cognitive performance.

And music with positive lyrics makes you more helpful and collaborative.

8) Use Music To Make You Smarter

There is a ton of evidence that music lessons improve IQ.

But there’s even research that says listening to classical music might boost brainpower as well:

Within 15 minutes of hearing the lecture, all the students took a multiple-choice quiz featuring questions based on the lecture material. The results: the students who heard the music-enhanced lecture scored significantly higher on the quiz than those who heard the music-free version.

9) Music Can Make You A Better Person

Need to soften someone’s heart? Maybe even your own?

Playing music can make you more compassionate:

In a year-long program focused on group music-making, 8- to 11-year old children became markedly more compassionate, according to a just-published study from the University of Cambridge. The finding suggests kids who make music together aren’t just having fun: they’re absorbing a key component of emotional intelligence.

Venezuela made music lessons mandatory. What happened? Crime went down and fewer kids dropped out of school:

A simple cost-benefit framework is used to estimate substantive social benefits associated with a universal music training program in Venezuela (B/C ratio of 1.68). Those social benefits accrue from both reduced school drop-out and declining community victimization. This evidence of important social benefits adds to the abundant evidence of individual gains reported by the developmental psychology literature.

Sum Up

So music not only says a lot about you, it provides a myriad of easy ways to make your life better:

  1. Music Can Help You Relax
  2. Angry Music Improves Your Performance
  3. Music Reduces Pain
  4. Music Can Give You A Better Workout
  5. Music Can Help You Find Love
  6. Music Can Save A Life
  7. Music Can Improve Your Work — Sometimes
  8. Use Music To Make You Smarter
  9. Music Can Make You A Better Person

Most importantly: Music makes us feel good, and in the end, that’s worth a lot.

Musicc

via Time

Read: What You Need To Learn To Code In 2014

Read: What You Need To Learn To Code In 2014

Alli Rense taught herself HTML at age 12 and never looked back. Since then, she worked in web development and project management for the US House of Representatives (please don’t hold that against her), nonprofits, and startups. She cofounded a hackerspace in 2008 and put her English degree to use with the blog formerly known as Hot Guys Reading Books which gave her 15 minutes of internet fame.

Continue reading “Read: What You Need To Learn To Code In 2014”

Hair-Raising Subway Ad Blows Away the Competition

Hair-Raising Subway Ad Blows Away the Competition

Using a bit of technology, Apotek, a pharmacy brand, outfitted subway platform ads in Stockholm with ultra-sonic sensors that discerned when a train was coming. The ad featured a model with a lush mane, and when the train came, her hair flapped in the wind and she struggled to keep it in place. I mean talk about Ad cleverness, right?

The tagline: Make your hair come alive.

Apotek Hjärtat – Blowing in The Wind from Ourwork on Vimeo.

via Mashable

Speaking.io: Practical advice for those who worry about public speaking

Speaking.io: Practical advice for those who worry about public speaking

Zach Holman (@holman), who works for GitHub as one of their first engineering hires. Having spoken at a lot of technical conferences than most of us, he shares a great set of practical advices for those who worry about public speaking on his site, Speaking.io.

Screen Shot 2014-02-22 at 3.42.18 PM

Public speaking is tough.

Be it at a conference, or during a company meeting, or in your car trying to persuade the cop not to ticket you for going three times the speed limit while streaming an episode of The Maury Povich Show on your iPad, talking in front of other people can be an intimidating experience.

Because “imagine everyone’s naked” is terrible advice