The 60 Most Powerful Photos Ever Taken That Perfectly Capture The Human Experience

The 60 Most Powerful Photos Ever Taken That Perfectly Capture The Human Experience

This incredible collection of moments represents the joy, innocence, despair, curiosity, and undying perseverance within all of us. No matter where we’re from, these are the emotions that unite us – it’s what makes us human. We set out to capture this spirit in 60 incredible photographs, and I truly hope you enjoy.

17 year old Jan Rose Kasmir offers a flower to soldiers during the Pentagon anti-war protest in 1967.

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A Brazilian protester stands before gunfire during protests against corruption and police brutality.

 

 

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Sergeant Frank Praytor looks after a two-week old kitten during the height of the Korean War.

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A curious Afghan girl holds the hand of an American soldier.

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A North Korean waves at his South Korean brother after inter-Korean temporary family reunions.

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Thania Sayne leans on the headstone of her husband the day before their wedding anniversary on 16 October 2013.

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Anna Fisher, astronaut, with stars in her eyes on the cover of Life magazine in 1985. She was the first mother in space.

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A journalist dashes across a bridge between to rescue a baby during Civil War. [1936]

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A Rwandan boy left scarred after being liberated from a death camp.

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Hamid Sardar captures a tribal Chhetri woman in Nepal. [2009]

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A boy crosses a London street in the 1960s with a toy double decker.

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Captain Donald Spindler pulls 6 year-old Aaliyah Frazier from a fire in Indiana

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The 60 Most Powerful Photos Ever Taken That Perfectly Capture The Human Experience

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This incredible collection of moments represents the joy, innocence, despair, curiosity, and undying perseverance within all of us. No matter where we’re from, these are the emotions that unite us – it’s what makes us human. We set out to capture this spirit in 60 incredible photographs, and I truly hope you enjoy.

17 year old Jan Rose Kasmir offers a flower to soldiers during the Pentagon anti-war protest in 1967.

17 year old Jan Rose Kasmir offers a flower to soldiers during the Pentagon anti-war protest in 1967.

Marc Riboud

A Brazilian protester stands before gunfire during protests against corruption and police brutality.

A Brazilian protester stands before gunfire during protests against corruption and police brutality.

Huffington Post

Sergeant Frank Praytor looks after a two-week old kitten during the height of the Korean War.

Sergeant Frank Praytor looks after a two-week old kitten during the height of the Korean War.

A North Korean waves at his South Korean brother after inter-Korean temporary family reunions.

A North Korean waves at his South Korean brother after inter-Korean temporary family reunions.

Thania Sayne leans on the headstone of her husband the day before their wedding anniversary on 16 October 2013.

Thania Sayne leans on the headstone of her husband the day before their wedding anniversary on 16 October 2013.

Manuel Balce Ceneta

Anna Fisher, astronaut, with stars in her eyes on the cover of Life magazine in 1985. She was the first mother in space.

Anna Fisher, astronaut, with stars in her eyes on the cover of Life magazine in 1985. She was the first mother in space.

Life Magazine (1985)

A journalist dashes across a bridge between to rescue a baby during Civil War. [1936]

A journalist dashes across a bridge between to rescue a baby during Civil War. [1936]

Horace Abrahams

A Rwandan boy left scarred after being liberated from a death camp.

A Rwandan boy left scarred after being liberated from a death camp.

James Nachtwey

Hamid Sardar captures a tribal Chhetri woman in Nepal. [2009]

Hamid Sardar captures a tribal Chhetri woman in Nepal. [2009]

Hamid Sardar

A man protests in Tiananmen Square, Beijing [1989]

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Violinist, Nancy Dinovo, cries while playing during a service at Christ Church Cathedral in downtown Vancouver for the September 11 victims.

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The child of a KKK member touches his reflection in an African American police officer’s riot shield during a demonstration. [1992]

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Clara Gantt is reunited with her husband’s body after more than 60 years. Sergeant Joseph Grantt went missing during the Korean war.

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“100,000 monks in prayer for a better world”

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Skater girls in Tehran.

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10 year old Yemeni girl smiling after she was granted a divorce from her husband – a grown adult.

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3 weeks old infant with albinism snuggles up to his cousin for a snooze.

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Lt. Colonel Robert L. Stirm is reunited with his family after being taken prisoner during the Vietnam war.

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An Irish teenager yells at British soldiers during unrest in Northern Ireland

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Dr. Religa monitors his patient’s vitals after a 23 hour long heart transplant surgery. His assistant is sleeping in the corner. [1987]

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The patient not only survived the surgery, but outlived his doctor.

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Protester plays piano over the sounds of chaos, with riot police in the backdrop.

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Supporters celebrate as Minnesota legalizes gay marriage

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The tattoo of wounded soldier Kyle Hockenberry becomes truth

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A bus of caring people save a woman who tried to commit suicide in China.

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Agim Shala is passed through a barbed wire fence to his grandparents at a camp for refugees of the Kosovo War

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via news.distractify

14 Instagram Photojournalists Who Will Open Your Eyes to the World

14 Instagram Photojournalists Who Will Open Your Eyes to the World

Instagram has transformed smartphone users into a legion of amateur photographers, handhelds forever at the ready. At its best, the photo-sharing platform captures the transcendental moments of the human experience (the Perseid meteor shower; a sunset over the Manhattan skyline). At its worst, utterly delightful banality (your pancake breakfast).

Critics have condemned “the Instagram effect” as a detriment to the immense care and skill that photography demands. Some argue its easy cropping and preset filters offer an oversimplified view of the craft. But Instagram is continuing to expand, and the pros have adapted to the platform with haste and grace.

“Photojournalism has become a hybrid enterprise of amateurs and professionals, along with surveillance cameras, Google Street Views and other sources,” photojournalist Fred Ritchin told Mother Jones earlier this year. “What is underrepresented are those ‘metaphotographers’ who can make sense of the billions of images being made, and can provide context and authenticate them.”

The 14 journalists on our list are using Instagram to take photos with as much sensitivity to context, composition and texture as they would behind a traditional lens. The result is a colorful glimpse into foreign cultures and crystallized moments of pain and joy.

 

1. Kevin Frayer (@kevinfrayer)

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Kevin Frayer is a photojournalist currently embedded in Asia, although his most recent Instagram photos have documented the devastation wrought by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. On his feed, stirring portraits and sunlit cityscapes captured in China give way to charged images of decimated city streets and survivors combing through the storm’s debris.
This photograph, one of many documenting the aftermath of the typhoon, depicts a mass grave erected for victims at the San Joaquin Parish in Tacloban, the Philippines.

2. Randy Olson (@randyolson)

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Randy Olson is a documentary photographer for National Geographic and founder of The Photo Society, a collective for contributors to the magazine. His Instagram feed reproduces prints from his documentary work in Africa, India and Australia.
This photograph was taken in the Omo River Valley in Ethiopia. “The region’s life-sustaining Omo River… will be choked by a Chinese dam in 2013,” Olson writes in his caption. “When the Gibe III dam goes online this culturally distinct area will be starving and heavily armed.”

3. Ivan Kashinsky (@ivankphoto)

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Ecuador-based freelance photographer and National Geographic contributor Ivan Kashinsky has published bright, buoyant photographs of festivals in the Andes and wealthy Roma families in a remote Romanian town. His Instagram photos are equally vibrant, documenting the lush landscapes of Ecuador and the colorful inhabitants of his neighborhood in a new, iPhone-only photo series entitled “Project Mi Barrio.”
The above photograph offers a view of the Cotopaxi National Park in Ecuador.

4. Benjamin Lowy (@benlowy)

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Feature photographer Benjamin Lowy was one of five photojournalists selected by TIME magazine to document Hurricane Sandy via Instagram when the storm struck New York City. One of the resulting photographs appeared on the cover of the magazine. Internationally, Lowy has covered 2003’s Iraq War and has been embedded in Darfur, Afghanistan and Libya.
In this photograph taken in Juba, South Sudan, an injured child recovers in a UN Mission trauma center. “Thousands of South Sudanese civilians have fled their homes following intense military clashes in the city of Juba,” Moore writes in his caption.

5. Ed Kashi (@edkashi)

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Ed Kashi is a photojournalist, filmmaker and lecturer who has recently been embedded in the Middle East while documenting the ongoing conflict in Syria. His Instagram portraits capture the daily life of Syrian refugees, with a particular focus on the children who have been displaced by the conflict. Another set of recent photographs, taken in New Jersey, offer a “then and now” look at the damage caused by Hurricane Sandy and the state’s recovery.
In this photograph, Syrian children play at the Domiz refugee camp in Northern Iraq.

6. David Guttenfelder (@dguttenfelder)

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David Guttenfelder, an Associated Press photographer and seven-time World Press Photo award winner, was just named TIME’s Instagram photographer of the year. In 2013, on assignment for the AP, Guttenfelder traveled to North Korea, where his Instagram photography offered a rare glimpse into the inner life of a nation normally obscured from public view. He has also photographed the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines as well as quaint pastoral scenes from rural America.
In this photograph, Guttenfelder captures a group of North Korean seamstresses at the Sonbong Textile Factory inside the Rason Special Economic Zone. “Nobody knows anything about [North Korea] and what it looks like,” Guttenfelder told TIME of his tenure. “I feel like there’s a big opportunity and a big responsibility.”

7. Lynsey Addario (@lynseyaddario)

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Lynsey Addario’s work as a humanitarian documentary photographer has taken her to Afghanistan under Taliban rule and to war zones in Iraq, Lebanon, Darfur and the Congo. Although her editorial work is weighted with the solemnity of the conflicts she depicts, her Instagram feed is decidedly lighter and more playful, with richly hued photos of sacks of olives in Lebanon and luminescent jellyfish at the London Aquarium.
The above photograph depicts a morning puja ritual in India.

8. Phil Moore (@philmoorephoto)

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Phil Moore is a freelance photojournalist based in East Africa. His editorial work captures stirring images of sectarian violence in the Congo, the arming of Libya in the wake of Arab Spring and crippling drought in the horn of Africa. On Instagram, Moore showcases sensitive portraits and snapshots of the sweeping African landscape in a wash of lush greens and browns.
In this photograph, Somali laborers work on a water catchment, or berked, which gathers rain water in anticipation of the dry season.

9. Michael Christopher Brown (@michaelchristopherbrown)

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Michael Christopher Brown is an American-born photojournalist and contributor to National Geographic currently embedded in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. He was featured in the HBO documentary Witness: Libya for his combat photography of the Libyan revolution and has also traveled along the railroads of China and to the remote, disputed Russian island of Sakhalin. The colorful compositions he shares on Instagram of soldiers and youths in the D.R.C. are interspersed with throwbacks to his tenure in Libya and moments of levity captured on the streets of Manhattan.
This serene city snapshot was captured in Goma, in the D.R.C.

10. Amy Toensing (@amytoensing)

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As a National Geographic contributor, Amy Toensing has traveled as far as Aboriginal Australia and as near as the Jersey Shore. In between, she teaches photography to children and adults in underserved communities. Her Instagram photos are saturated with color, depicting lively landscapes and portraits of women and children.
This photograph was taken on a rickshaw ride in Vrindavan, India.

11. Laura El-Tantawy (@laura_eltantawy)

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Freelance British-Egyptian photographer Laura El-Tantawy has a penchant for the abstract in her Instagram photos. She’s often captivated by the ripple of fabric, the sun peeking through the clouds or the droplets of rain on a pane of glass. The portraits she shares on her feed are taken at close range, zeroing in on just the subject’s face, to seem especially intimate, and they are usually accompanied by a brief story about the subject.
This photograph, captioned “City of 1,000 Minarets,” depicts two ornate mosque spires in Cairo, Egypt.

12. Andrew Quilty (@andrewquilty)

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Australian-born photographer Andrew Quilty is currently embedded in Afghanistan, where he captures black-and-white portraits that focus on daily life in the capital city of Kabul. His high-contrast landscapes are equally striking, depicting the city in a wash of warm blues and earth tones.
This photograph of two youths in Kabul was taken from the window of a moving car. “In most other places you’d pull over, jump out and take it all in,” Quilty writes in the caption. “Here, it’s not always advisable to leave the passenger seat.”

13. Glenna Gordon (@glennagordon)

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Glenna Gordon’s African photography has documented the dangerous literary pursuits of Northern Nigerian female romance novelists and displays of wealth in Nigerian marriage ceremonies. Her Instagram photos, in contrast, often focus on the details and textures rather than the sweeping stories, depicting instead the frost-covered leaves on the streets of New York City or the thatched roof of a Darfuri refugee’s shelter.
The above photograph was taken in Nairobi, Kenya.

14. Marcus Bleasdale (@marcusbleasdale)

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Marcus Bleasdale is a documentary photographer for National Geographic with a focus on human rights issues. In his editorial work, Bleasdale presents a jarring portrait of African nations in conflict. His most recent posts to Instagram juxtapose images of violence in the Central African Republic with idyllic photographs from the U.S. and Europe that are no less attentive to detail and composition.
The above photograph depicts a camp for displaced persons in Bossangoa, in the Central African Republic. “Hundreds of thousands of people are displaced in towns and in the bush as Muslim Seleke fighters attack Christian villages burning and looting homes,” Bleasdale writes in the caption. “In response, Christian Anti Balaka (Anti Machete fighters roam the villages with artisanal weapons seeking revenge. This conflict which has been ongoing since late March 2013 is largely unreported and many the the needy displaced on both sides of the conflict are in desperate need of medication and international intervention.”

via Mashable

Laura Williams Talks About Her Surreal Self-Portrait that Went Viral

Laura Williams Talks About Her Surreal Self-Portrait that Went Viral

Surreal self-portraits from young photographers are nothing new. In fact, one could say there are almost too many of them out there. But that makes it that much more impressive when a young photog breaks out of the pack and catches the attention of the masses.

That’s exactly what 18-year-old photographer and college student Laura Williams did with her viral self-portrait series ‘Invisible.’

The main viral image, the one that reached the front page of Reddit and earned her Flickr stream hundreds of thousands of views, was the one you see above. Using a mirror that she found in her aunt’s house, she created the illusion that her torso had disappeared entirely.

The photo also earned her her own “Flickr Moment” in which she explains how she shot this photo, where she draws her inspiration and why she loves this kind of surreal work:

Williams explains that the shoot itself was quite challenging because she was alone and had to keep getting back up to adjust focus after every shot, but the real fun began after the image was taken.

“The post production was really fun and that’s when the image really came together for me,” she says in the video. “It allowed to really play with the illusion and create the mood that I wanted… which is the feeling we all have of not being heard. Perhaps it stems from our youth, but I think it’s something we can all relate to.”

To learn more about Williams and this photo, be sure to check out the video above. And if you’d like to see more of her surreal work, head over to her Flickr stream or follow her on Facebook by following the corresponding links.

via PetaPixel

Gallery: 27 Photos That Will Give You Mind-Bending Dreams

Gallery: 27 Photos That Will Give You Mind-Bending Dreams

These 27 surreal photos featuring people are bound to pique your subconscious’ imagination. Happy Dreaming!

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via 500px

The world’s largest photo service, Getty Images, just made its pictures free to use

The world’s largest photo service, Getty Images, just made its pictures free to use

If you go to the Getty Images website, you’ll see millions of images, all watermarked. There are more than a hundred years of photography here, from FDR on the campaign trail to last Sunday’s Oscars, all stamped with the same transparent square placard reminding you that you don’t own the rights. If you want Getty to take off the watermark, you’ll have to pay for it.

Starting now, that’s going to change. Getty Images is dropping the watermark for the bulk of its collection, in exchange for an open-embed program that will let users drop in any image they want, as long as the service gets to append a footer at the bottom of the picture with a credit and link to the licensing page. For a small-scale WordPress blog with no photo budget, this looks an awful lot like free stock imagery.

It’s a real risk for the company, since it’s easy to screenshot the new versions if you want to snag an unlicensed version. But according to Craig Peters, a business development exec at Getty Images, that ship sailed long ago. “Look, if you want to get a Getty image today, you can find it without a watermark very simply,” he says. “The way you do that is you go to one of our customer sites and you right-click. Or you go to Google Image search or Bing Image Search and you get it there. And that’s what’s happening… Our content was everywhere already.”

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Looking at the pictures on Twitter, it’s hard to disagree. Wildly popular accounts like @historyinpics can amass hundreds of thousands of followers with nothing but uncredited, unlicensed images, and since there’s no direct revenue, there’s little point in asking them to pay. At that scale, anything more expensive than free is a prohibitive cost. The new embeds strike directly at that kind of social sharing, with native code for sharing in Twitter and Tumblr alongside the traditional WordPress-friendly embed code. Peters’ bet is that if web publishers have a legal, free path to use the images, they’ll take it, opening up a new revenue stream for Getty and photographers.

The new money comes because, once the images are embedded, Getty has much more control over the images. The new embeds are built on the same iframe code that lets you embed a tweet or a YouTube video, which means the company can use embeds to plant ads or collect user information. “We’ve certainly thought about it, whether it’s data or it’s advertising,” Peters says, even if those features aren’t part of the initial rollout.

The clear comparison is the music industry, which was hit hard by piracy in the ’90s and took decades to respond. “Before there was iTunes, before there was Spotify, people were put in that situation where they were basically forced to do the wrong thing, sharing files,” Peters says. Now, if an aspiring producer wants to leak a song to the web but keep control of it, they can drop it on Soundcloud. Any blog can embed the player, and the artist can disable it whenever they want. And as Google has proved with YouTube, it’s easy to drop ads or “buy here” links into that embed. “We’ve seen what YouTube’s done with monetizing their embed capabilities,” Peters says. “I don’t know if that’s going to be appropriate for us or not.” But as long as the images are being taken as embeds rather than free-floating files, the company will have options.

Getty Images’ profits haven’t cratered like music conglomerates: its profits actuallyincreased nearly $100 million from 2007 to 2011, thanks in part to digital licensing. Still, the digital shift has been hard on photographers, with professional stipendsincreasingly replaced by smaller payments to amateur or freelance photographers. Part of Peters’ promise is that the new embeds will open up larger flows of money down the road.

The biggest effect might be on the nature of the web itself. Embeds from Twitter and YouTube are already a crucial part of the modern web, but they’ve also enabled a more advanced kind of link rot, as deleted tweets and videos leave holes in old blog posts. If the new embeds take off, becoming a standard for low-rent WordPress blogs, they’ll extend that webby decay to the images themselves. On an embed-powered web, a change in contracts could leave millions of posts with no lead image, or completely erase a post likethis one.

Still, such long-term effects are years away, if they happen at all. In the meantime, Getty Images is focused on the more immediate problem of infringement. “The principle is to turn what’s infringing use with good intentions, turning that into something that’s valid licensed use with some benefits going back to the photographer,” says Peters, “and that starts really with attribution and a link back.”

via TheVerge

Gallery: Instanspiration – Part 2

Gallery: Instanspiration – Part 2

Instanspiration is a great way of getting exposure for your work. You could feature your work by simply letting us notice your work in one way or the other. Comment your best instas (and not profile) below, tag with @waseefakhtar, tweet to @navigationstack or post/message us via our Facebook Page.

Not feeling myself lately. Been a little under the weather.

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Fashion Week on phlearn. #fashionweek #phlearn #fashion

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يا ملاذ الحيارى، يا مجيب السائلين.

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밤걸음 #yoonskiSAPPORO #yoonskiJAPAN #yoonskiwithNEX7

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Confession: I am so not a morning person.

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Thank you.

27 Incredibly Clever Print Ads

27 Incredibly Clever Print Ads

We don’t know since when have online advertising been called junk and of no purpose. But when it comes to print ads, some advertisements could really inspire and revive the artists in all of you.

THIS is advertising.

1. Hut Weber

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2. Colgate dental floss.

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3. Sugar free Chupa Chups

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4. Weight Watchers

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5. Keloptic

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6. Pepsi

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7. LEGO

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8. Oogmerk

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9. Nivea Men

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10. Moms Demand Action

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11. MA

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12. Liking Isn’t Helping

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13. StrongerMarriage.org

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14. McDonald’s

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15. Kielo Travel

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16. Ecovia

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17. Pedigree

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18. King Khalib Foundation

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19. Orion Telescopes

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20. Volkswagon

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21. Face-a-book

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22. Mastercard

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23. WWF

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24. Guinness

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25. Nivea Night

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26. Plant for the Planet

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27. FedEx China-Australia

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